November 9th, 2022

Middle School Resource: Veterans Day Observance

Middle School Resource

Veterans Day Observance

Objectives:

  • Students will gain an awareness of various employment opportunities at a hospital.
  • Students will become aware of the importance of veterans.

Activity:

  • Students write letters to local veterans’ medical facilities, inviting them to send representatives to their class.
  • Teacher works with hospital staff to ensure that representatives from various departments visit the class.
  • Medical center representatives provide information on employment opportunities and educational requirements.
  • Students write to patients at the veterans’ hospital to invite them to speak to the class.
  • Invited veterans give oral presentations on military experiences and government programs for veterans.
  • Hold a social following the assembly.
  • Students conduct additional research on services or lack of services for veterans.
  • Students write thank-you notes to visitors.
  • Students write letters about veterans’ concerns to local, state, and national political leaders.

Related NY State Academic Standards: W.7.4, W.7.7, SL.7.1, and more!

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November 7th, 2022

Elementary School Resource: Veteran’s Day

Elementary School Resource

Veteran’s Day

This site provides information about Veteran’s Day. It also offers resources, lesson plans and activities for Memorial Day. There are also suggested ways for students to connect to American soldiers available on the site.

Related NY State Academic Standards: SS.K.ID.3.b, SS.K.ID.3.b.1, SS.1.ID.2.a.2, and more!

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November 4th, 2022

High School Resource: Roman Art from the Louvre Webisodes by ArtBabble.org

High School Resource

Roman Art from the Louvre Webisodes by ArtBabble.org

This video series focuses on Roman art from the Louvre.

Related NY State Academic Standards: NAS.VA.Pr6.1.6.a, NAS.VA.Re7.1.8.a, ARTS.VA.C.3.1.GE.C, and more!

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November 2nd, 2022

Middle School Resource: Art & Ecology by NGA

Middle School Resource

Art & Ecology by NGA

Artists are often particularly keen observers and precise recorders of the physical conditions of the natural world. As a result, paintings can be good resources for learning about ecology. Teachers can use these lessons to examine with students the interrelationship of geography, natural resources, and climate and their effects on daily life. These lessons also address the roles students can take in caring for the environment.

Related NY State Academic Standards: ARTS.VA.I.1.1.A, ARTS.VA.I.1.1.B, ARTS.VA.I.1.1.C, and more!

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October 31st, 2022

Elementary School Resource: Art Gallery: Starfall

Elementary School Resource

Art Gallery: Starfall

This page contains short, interactive books about the famous artists Vincent van Gogh, Georges Seurat, Paul Gauguin, Marc Chagall, Ernie Barnes, and Dorothy Strait. In addition to helping students practice basic reading skills, these books provide worksheets where students can write personal responses to the artists’ work.

Related NY State Academic Standards: RL.PK.5, RF.PK.1.a, RF.PK.1.b, and more!

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October 28th, 2022

High School Resource: Adventures in History Series: The Grand Canal New York’s First Thruway

High School Resource

Adventures in History Series: The Grand Canal New York’s First Thruway

Authors Eric Brunger and Lionel Wyld detail the history of the Erie Canal from its first inception as an idea in 1700 to its completion in 1825.

This pamphlet is one of twenty-seven volumes in the Adventures in WNY History Series, which were produced based on the collections and archives of the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society. The contents of the pamphlets, including the images, are copyrighted by the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society. They can be used exclusively for educational purposes described under the federal copyright laws. Some original copies may be purchased from the museum shop.

This pamphlet is appropriate for students studying local, New York State, and US history.

Related NY State Academic Standards: RI.11-12.8, RI.11-12.9, RH.9-10.3, and more!

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October 26th, 2022

Middle School Resource: The Map of New York State

Middle School Resource

The Map of New York State

In this activity, students will identify the major physical features of New York State in the teaching language (TL).

Related NY State Academic Standards: LOTE.ML.1.1.A.A, LOTE.ML.2.1.A.A, LOTE.AS.1.1.A.C, and more!

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October 24th, 2022

Elementary School Resource: Adventures in History Series: The Canadian Shore

Elementary School Resource

Adventures in History Series: The Canadian Shore

Although divided by water, Western New Yorkers have a long history with the Canadian Shore of Ontario. Author Peter C. Andrews examines this noteworthy and historic relationship.

This pamphlet is one of twenty-seven volumes in the Adventures in WNY History Series, which were produced based on the collections and archives of the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society. The contents of the pamphlets, including the images, are copyrighted by the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society. They can be used exclusively for educational purposes described under the federal copyright laws. Some original copies may be purchased from the museum shop.

This pamphlet is appropriate for elementary and intermediate students studying local and New York State history.

Related NY State Academic Standards: SS.4.6.c.2, SS.4.6.e, .8.2.b, and more!

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October 21st, 2022

High School Resource: Milk Makes Me Sick by Exploratorium

High School Resource

Milk Makes Me Sick by Exploratorium

In this activity, you will,

  1. Test that your glucose test strips work with positive and negative controls. Follow the directions on your brand of strip, and dip strips into:
    a) glucose solution positive control), and
    b) water (the negative control). Wait for length of time specified by strip directions, then record any color changes of the strip and compare to the key on the bottle to determine glucose concentration of the tested fluid. If the strips determine that the glucose solution has NO glucose in it, or registers far less than 2%, the strips are defective and should be discarded. The experiment cannot be performed until new strips are obtained. Teachers may wish to check the strips prior to introducing this activity to their class. When performed by the class, the results of these controls should be recorded on the board for future reference.
  2. Pour about one half inch of regular milk (about 3 ml) and Lactaid (lactose free) milk into separate test tubes, one of each for each group, and label “A” and “B” to hide the identity of the fluids from the students.
  3. Determine the glucose concentration of “A” by following the directions for your brand of glucose test strips. Compare the color of the strip after dipping it in the milk (as per directions on the test strip bottle) with the color-coded key on the side of the bottle to determine the concentration of glucose in the milk.
  4. Determine the concentration of glucose in “B” by using a fresh test strip, following the directions on the bottle and comparing the color of the test strip after dipping it in the milk with the color-coded key on the side of the bottle.
  5. Class results should be tabulated on the board so that everyone can see them. Acknowledge that small variations between groups may be due to differences in how the procedure was carried out (for example; most strips require reading at an exact time after dipping; if students do not follow the instructions exactly, small variations in results may be obtained). Do not be overly concerned about small variations, as long as the water is “negative” for glucose and the glucose solution is “positive” for glucose.
  6. Add one drop of “mystery drops” to one half inch of “A” (the same “A” from step #3). Warm the milk by rolling the tube back and forth in your hands for 2 minutes. Repeat the glucose test with a fresh test strip as indicated in #3 above. Is the glucose concentration now the same or different as compared to the concentration in “A” prior to adding the “mystery drops”?
  7. Add one drop of mystery fluid to “B” (the same “B” from step #4 above. Warm the milk by rolling the tube back and forth in your hands for 2 minutes. Repeat the glucose test with a fresh test strip as indicated in #4 above. Is the glucose concentration now the same or different as compared to the concentration in “B: prior to adding the “mystery drops”?
  8. Tabulate class results on the board, as in #5 above.
  9. Explain your results. Is there a difference in glucose concentration between fluids “A” and “B” before addition of the “mystery drops”? Postulate as to what the difference means. Do the glucose concentrations of “A” and “B” change after the addition of the “mystery drops”? What could account for the change? At this point, students may conclude that somehow the “mystery drops” converted something in the regular milk to glucose. This may be true, but at this point one other possibility cannot be ruled out – see if the class can think of what that is. If they are unable to present an alternate hypothesis, prod them with the following: How do you know that the mystery drops are not glucose? The “mystery drops” are added to a substance which had a negative glucose reaction, and all of a sudden that same substance gives a positive reaction. Unless the mystery drops (I.e. lactase drops) themselves are tested with the glucose strips, no conclusions can be reached! Students should then test the “mystery drops” with the glucose strips. Add the result of this test to the data recorded on the board. Now what sort of conclusions can be drawn from the data?

Related NY State Academic Standards: S.MS.LS.1.1, S.MS.LS.1.2, S.MS.LS.1.3, and more!

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October 19th, 2022

Middle School Resource: Classroom Idea: Consuming Milk

Middle School Resource

Classroom Idea: Consuming Milk

In this activity, write an equation for the number of gallons of milk for any given number of students in the following situation:
Two out of every three students who eat in the cafeteria drink a half-pint of white milk. If 450 students eat in the cafeteria, how many gallons of milk are consumed?

Related NY State Academic Standards: 6.NS.2, MST3.5.PS.14, MST3.5.CN.6, and more!

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